NBA Cribs: The Golden State Warriors and Their All-Star Real Estate

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    Getty Images; realtor.com

    All hail the mighty Golden State Warriors! Few pro sports franchise teams this side of the New England Patriots have inspired both awe and vitriol quite like this seemingly unstoppable championship-winning NBA team, currently vying for its third title against the Cleveland Cavaliers. And there are some strong real estate tie-ins with this superteam, from the league-changing, off-court steal (of free agent Kevin Durant) clinched at a Hamptons mansion, to the hot San Francisco Bay Area housing market, where the team plays.

    In fact, this All-Star-studded team has been as busy gunning and running in luxury real estate as it has on the hardwood. So taking a cue from the Splash Brothers, we decided to dive deep into the homes of the Warriors.

    Steph Curry flurry of real estate deals

    As with his on-court sharpshooting prowess, 30-year-old All-Star Steph Curry hit nothing but net with his most recent Bay Area home purchase. Over the past five years, the North Carolina native has been busy buying and selling homes.

    When not shooting out the lights in Oracle Arena, he and his wife, Ayesha Curry, live in the quiet East Bay suburb of Alamo, CA, in the 10,290-square-foot home they purchased in 2016.

    Steph Curry’s current home in Alamo, CA | realtor.com

    It’s easy to put this home in the W column for Curry, because he scored a bargain. The mansion originally landed on the market for $7.8 million, and the MVP snagged it for $5,775,000.

    Sitting on a 1.5-acre lot, the mansion has five bedrooms, 8.5 baths, a library, billiard room, and five fireplaces. Outside there’s an infinity pool, guesthouse, kitchen, and gardens. It sounds clutch to us.

    Curry hasn’t always had the magic touch when it comes to real estate. He somehow managed to sell his Walnut Creek home at a loss, despite the scorching Bay Area housing market.

    The Currys had purchased the Mediterranean-style mansion in the East Bay city in November 2015 for $3.2 million. After spending a half-million on renovations and upgrades, the couple cited privacy concerns and put the home back on the market for $3.7 million in November 2016. They finally sold the place in July 2017 for $3.2 million, making them ineligible for the house-flipping hall of fame.

    Curry’s former home in Walnut Creek, CA | realtor.com

    Previously, the Currys lived in the sleepy suburb of Orinda, CA, where they bought a Spanish-style, five-bedroom home in August 2013 for $3.1 million.

    Curry’s former home in Orinda, CA | realtor.com

    The couple spent oodles of dough upgrading the kitchen of their Orinda home—Ayesha is well-known for her cooking endeavors—but wound up putting it on the market for $3.9 million in May 2016. For this sale, Curry demonstrated his deft scoring touch. The home sold for $4.65 million after just a month on the market.

    Outside the Golden State, the Currys put their first home up for sale in North Carolina earlier this year. It’s where the couple married. Still availablefor $1.55 million, the European-style house was described as “much like who they are as a couple: lovely and modest.”

    Curry’s house in Waxhaw, NC | realtor.com

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    Kevin Durant’s All-Star homes

    The Hamptons home where Kevin Durant was recruited to join the already loaded Golden State Warriors in summer 2016 could possibly be considered a “national historical site.”  

    The mansion Kevin Durant rented in East Hampton, NY | realtor.com

    The property Durant rented where he met with his future teammates is now on the market for $15 million—and it’s a prized and very high-end piece of NBA memorabilia. 

    Durant is also known to have set up shop in a modern abode in the Oakland Hills, where he filmed a home tour for his YouTube channel, which also showcases his chef and his dog.

    He made headlines in April when he scooped up an off-season home on the West Coast. He bought a beachfront property in Malibu for $12.05 million. The four-bedroom, six-bath home features an open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, and walls of glass. 

    Other amenities include a wine wall, library, home theater, gym, wet bar, and multiple patios and decks.

    Previously, Durant had a couple of losses to contend with. While a member of the Oklahoma City Thunder in 2015, and amid speculation about his next destination once his contract was up, he parted ways with a deluxe condo on Biscayne Bay in Miami.

    The three-bedroom unit was listed for $3.45 million in April 2015, and sold for $3.15 million just one month later.

    Durant’s former condo in Miami, FL | realtor.com

    The MVP also parted with his posh place in the Sooner State: a 7,000-square-foot townhouse (two separate units were combined).

    He took a big loss as he burned rubber on his way out of Oklahoma. He paid $1,769,000 for the place in 2013, spent money on upgrades, and wound up selling it all for $1.1 million in March 2017.

    Durant’s former townhouse in Oklahoma City, OK | realtor.com

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    Klay Thompson scores a beach house

    The man with the quickest shot in the league, Klay Thompson spends the off-season in Orange County. One-half of the Splash Brothers, he made waves with his purchase of a $2.2 million Dana Point house in 2015.

    The Spanish-style, single-story home features a central courtyard with a pool and spa, two guesthouses, and a patio with ocean views. The three-bedroom home includes a rec room with bar, lounge area, and pool table. 

    When in the Bay Area, Thompson’s exact whereabouts are unknown. However, teammate Draymond Green once described Thompson’s place as a “trap house.” Green told Jimmy Kimmel last year, “Klay has a million people living with him. … It’s weird.”

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    Andre Iguodala’s moved in

    The 34-year-old forward was recently sidelined with an injury, but he’s definitely stayed strong in the real estate game. As we reported in 2017, the NBA vet picked up a sweet house in Lafayette, CA, for $3.6 million.

    Built in 2004, the “Tuscan-inspired” abode features an office, media room, and gym. Outside there’s a “resort-style” pool and spa, manicured lawn and gardens, dining area with pizza oven, and, naturally, a sport court with a basketball hoop.

    Andre Iguodala's Lafayette, CA, home
    Andre Iguodala’s Lafayette, CA, home | realtor.com

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    Joe Lacob’s buying spree

    Venture capitalist Joseph Lacob and a group of investors bought the Golden State Warriors for $450 million in 2010, when the team was a perennial laughingstock. The franchise is now valued at $2.6 billion, according to Forbes.

    Lacob also has a keen eye for real estate. He owns a 10,355-square-foot home in exclusive Atherton, CA,which he purchased in 2007 for $15.2 million. In 2008, he scooped up the adjoining two-bed, three-bath home for $4.3 million, according to realtor.com records. 

    The 62-year-old also owns a stunning estate in Napa County’s St. Helena, which he snagged for $9 million in 2011. The 21.6-acre property includes a 5,299-square-foot house, which features a family room with fireplace, an open kitchen, and a wine cellar. Outside, there’s a grassy backyard with a pool, and acres of vineyards.

    Joe Lacob's vacation home in St. Helena, CA
    Joe Lacob’s vacation home in St. Helena, CA | realtor.com

    The venture capitalist also has a massive 12,164-square-foot home in the golf mecca of Pebble Beach, which sits on nearly 2 acres, according to property records. 

    A partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, a pre-eminent Silicon Valley venture capital firm, Lacob isn’t immune to stumbles due to market forces. He sold his luxe Hawaii home at a loss last year for $5.9 million. He had picked up the place in 2005 for $7,775,000, and listed it in 2016 for $7 million. It’s a rare loss for this owner who’s become very accustomed to winning.

    Lacob's former home in Kailua-Kona, HI
    Lacob’s former home in Kailua-Kona, HI | realtor.com

     

    Originally Posted in: Realtor.com

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